Grammar is background in sentence processing

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Standard

Grammar is background in sentence processing. / Christensen, Marie Herget; Kristensen, Line Burholt; Vinther, Nicoline Munck; Boye, Kasper.

I: Language and Cognition, 12.10.2020.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Christensen, MH, Kristensen, LB, Vinther, NM & Boye, K 2020, 'Grammar is background in sentence processing', Language and Cognition. https://doi.org/10.1017/langcog.2020.30

APA

Christensen, M. H., Kristensen, L. B., Vinther, N. M., & Boye, K. (2020). Grammar is background in sentence processing. Language and Cognition. https://doi.org/10.1017/langcog.2020.30

Vancouver

Christensen MH, Kristensen LB, Vinther NM, Boye K. Grammar is background in sentence processing. Language and Cognition. 2020 okt 12. https://doi.org/10.1017/langcog.2020.30

Author

Christensen, Marie Herget ; Kristensen, Line Burholt ; Vinther, Nicoline Munck ; Boye, Kasper. / Grammar is background in sentence processing. I: Language and Cognition. 2020.

Bibtex

@article{5804009b6a264e308e744d6feca914f7,
title = "Grammar is background in sentence processing",
abstract = "Boye and Harder (2012) claim that the grammatical-lexical distinction has to do with discourse prominence: lexical elements can convey discursively primary (or foreground) information, whereas grammatical elements cannot (outside corrective contexts). This paper reports two experiments that test this claim. Experiment 1 was a letter detection study, in which readers were instructed to mark specific letters in the text. Experiment 2 was a text-change study, in which participants were asked to register omitted words. Experiment 2 showed a main effect of word category: readers attend more to words in lexical elements (e.g. full verbs) than to those in grammatical elements (e.g. auxiliaries). Experiment 1 showed an interaction: attention to letters in focused constituents increased more for grammatical words than for lexical words. The results suggest that the lexical-grammatical contrast does indeed guide readers’ attention to words.",
keywords = "Faculty of Humanities, grammatik, opm{\ae}rksomhed, leksikon, Fokus, bogstavs{\o}gning, {\AE}ndringsblindhed, S{\ae}tningsprocessering, grammar, attention, lexicon, focus, letter detection, change blindness, sentence processing",
author = "Christensen, {Marie Herget} and Kristensen, {Line Burholt} and Vinther, {Nicoline Munck} and Kasper Boye",
year = "2020",
month = "10",
day = "12",
doi = "10.1017/langcog.2020.30",
language = "English",
journal = "Language and Cognition",
issn = "1866-9808",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Grammar is background in sentence processing

AU - Christensen, Marie Herget

AU - Kristensen, Line Burholt

AU - Vinther, Nicoline Munck

AU - Boye, Kasper

PY - 2020/10/12

Y1 - 2020/10/12

N2 - Boye and Harder (2012) claim that the grammatical-lexical distinction has to do with discourse prominence: lexical elements can convey discursively primary (or foreground) information, whereas grammatical elements cannot (outside corrective contexts). This paper reports two experiments that test this claim. Experiment 1 was a letter detection study, in which readers were instructed to mark specific letters in the text. Experiment 2 was a text-change study, in which participants were asked to register omitted words. Experiment 2 showed a main effect of word category: readers attend more to words in lexical elements (e.g. full verbs) than to those in grammatical elements (e.g. auxiliaries). Experiment 1 showed an interaction: attention to letters in focused constituents increased more for grammatical words than for lexical words. The results suggest that the lexical-grammatical contrast does indeed guide readers’ attention to words.

AB - Boye and Harder (2012) claim that the grammatical-lexical distinction has to do with discourse prominence: lexical elements can convey discursively primary (or foreground) information, whereas grammatical elements cannot (outside corrective contexts). This paper reports two experiments that test this claim. Experiment 1 was a letter detection study, in which readers were instructed to mark specific letters in the text. Experiment 2 was a text-change study, in which participants were asked to register omitted words. Experiment 2 showed a main effect of word category: readers attend more to words in lexical elements (e.g. full verbs) than to those in grammatical elements (e.g. auxiliaries). Experiment 1 showed an interaction: attention to letters in focused constituents increased more for grammatical words than for lexical words. The results suggest that the lexical-grammatical contrast does indeed guide readers’ attention to words.

KW - Faculty of Humanities

KW - grammatik

KW - opmærksomhed

KW - leksikon

KW - Fokus

KW - bogstavsøgning

KW - Ændringsblindhed

KW - Sætningsprocessering

KW - grammar

KW - attention

KW - lexicon

KW - focus

KW - letter detection

KW - change blindness

KW - sentence processing

U2 - 10.1017/langcog.2020.30

DO - 10.1017/langcog.2020.30

M3 - Journal article

JO - Language and Cognition

JF - Language and Cognition

SN - 1866-9808

ER -

ID: 248233294