Mirroring patients – or not: A study of general practitioners and psychiatrists and their interactions with patients with depression.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

Mirroring patients – or not : A study of general practitioners and psychiatrists and their interactions with patients with depression. / Davidsen, Annette Sofie; Fosgerau, Christina Fogtmann.

I: European Journal of Psychotherapy, Bind 17, Nr. 2, 2015, s. 162-178.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Davidsen, AS & Fosgerau, CF 2015, 'Mirroring patients – or not: A study of general practitioners and psychiatrists and their interactions with patients with depression.', European Journal of Psychotherapy, bind 17, nr. 2, s. 162-178. https://doi.org/10.1080/13642537.2015.1027785

APA

Davidsen, A. S., & Fosgerau, C. F. (2015). Mirroring patients – or not: A study of general practitioners and psychiatrists and their interactions with patients with depression. European Journal of Psychotherapy, 17(2), 162-178. https://doi.org/10.1080/13642537.2015.1027785

Vancouver

Davidsen AS, Fosgerau CF. Mirroring patients – or not: A study of general practitioners and psychiatrists and their interactions with patients with depression. European Journal of Psychotherapy. 2015;17(2):162-178. https://doi.org/10.1080/13642537.2015.1027785

Author

Davidsen, Annette Sofie ; Fosgerau, Christina Fogtmann. / Mirroring patients – or not : A study of general practitioners and psychiatrists and their interactions with patients with depression. I: European Journal of Psychotherapy. 2015 ; Bind 17, Nr. 2. s. 162-178.

Bibtex

@article{6b1af74a5924401ab46d9b30cee0c901,
title = "Mirroring patients – or not: A study of general practitioners and psychiatrists and their interactions with patients with depression.",
abstract = "For mentalization theorists, implicit mentalization is a key component ofall forms of therapy. However, it has been difficult to grasp and to describeprecisely how implicit mentalization works. It is said to take place partlyby mirroring others in posture, facial expression and vocal tone. Based onstudies of imitative behaviour within linguistics and psychology, we arguethat interactional mirroring is an important aspect of displaying implicitmentalization. We aimed to explore if, and in that case how, mirroring isdisplayed by general practitioners (GPs) and psychiatrists in consultationswith patients with depression. We wanted to see how implicit mentalizingunfolds in physician–patient interactions. Consultations were videorecordedand analysed within the framework of conversation analysis. GPsand psychiatrists differed substantially in their propensity to mirror bodymovements and verbal and acoustic features of speech. GPs mirrored theirpatients more than psychiatrists in all modalities and were more flexible intheir interactional behaviour. Psychiatrists seemed more static, regardlessof the emotionality displayed by patients. Implicitly mirroring and attuningto patients could signify enactment of implicit mentalization, according tohow it is described by mentalization theorists. We discuss reasons for thedifferences between GPs and psychiatrists, and their implications.",
author = "Davidsen, {Annette Sofie} and Fosgerau, {Christina Fogtmann}",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1080/13642537.2015.1027785",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
pages = "162--178",
journal = "European Journal of Psychotherapy, Counselling and Health",
issn = "1364-2537",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mirroring patients – or not

T2 - A study of general practitioners and psychiatrists and their interactions with patients with depression.

AU - Davidsen, Annette Sofie

AU - Fosgerau, Christina Fogtmann

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - For mentalization theorists, implicit mentalization is a key component ofall forms of therapy. However, it has been difficult to grasp and to describeprecisely how implicit mentalization works. It is said to take place partlyby mirroring others in posture, facial expression and vocal tone. Based onstudies of imitative behaviour within linguistics and psychology, we arguethat interactional mirroring is an important aspect of displaying implicitmentalization. We aimed to explore if, and in that case how, mirroring isdisplayed by general practitioners (GPs) and psychiatrists in consultationswith patients with depression. We wanted to see how implicit mentalizingunfolds in physician–patient interactions. Consultations were videorecordedand analysed within the framework of conversation analysis. GPsand psychiatrists differed substantially in their propensity to mirror bodymovements and verbal and acoustic features of speech. GPs mirrored theirpatients more than psychiatrists in all modalities and were more flexible intheir interactional behaviour. Psychiatrists seemed more static, regardlessof the emotionality displayed by patients. Implicitly mirroring and attuningto patients could signify enactment of implicit mentalization, according tohow it is described by mentalization theorists. We discuss reasons for thedifferences between GPs and psychiatrists, and their implications.

AB - For mentalization theorists, implicit mentalization is a key component ofall forms of therapy. However, it has been difficult to grasp and to describeprecisely how implicit mentalization works. It is said to take place partlyby mirroring others in posture, facial expression and vocal tone. Based onstudies of imitative behaviour within linguistics and psychology, we arguethat interactional mirroring is an important aspect of displaying implicitmentalization. We aimed to explore if, and in that case how, mirroring isdisplayed by general practitioners (GPs) and psychiatrists in consultationswith patients with depression. We wanted to see how implicit mentalizingunfolds in physician–patient interactions. Consultations were videorecordedand analysed within the framework of conversation analysis. GPsand psychiatrists differed substantially in their propensity to mirror bodymovements and verbal and acoustic features of speech. GPs mirrored theirpatients more than psychiatrists in all modalities and were more flexible intheir interactional behaviour. Psychiatrists seemed more static, regardlessof the emotionality displayed by patients. Implicitly mirroring and attuningto patients could signify enactment of implicit mentalization, according tohow it is described by mentalization theorists. We discuss reasons for thedifferences between GPs and psychiatrists, and their implications.

U2 - 10.1080/13642537.2015.1027785

DO - 10.1080/13642537.2015.1027785

M3 - Journal article

VL - 17

SP - 162

EP - 178

JO - European Journal of Psychotherapy, Counselling and Health

JF - European Journal of Psychotherapy, Counselling and Health

SN - 1364-2537

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 141094206